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Many thanks to Radio CJPN-CKMA-CHQC-CKRT- Miramichi’s French community radio station for sharing Friends of Beaubears Island Inc on their new digital sign located by airport.

Un grand merci à Radio CJPN-CKMA-CHQC-CKRT- La station de radio communautaire francophone de Miramichi pour avoir partagé Friends of Beaubears Island Inc sur leur nouvelle enseigne numérique située près de l'aéroport.

#supporteachother
#Nonprofit #kindness
#Beaubears island
#beaubears
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janvier 25th, 6:01
The Loyalist  at work on Sept.12,1957
In the spring of 1955, the Loyalist took over from the Frances Ullock. She was brought to the Miramichi from Saint John. This wooden ferry was built in Shelbourne, Nova Scotia, and was
launched on April 1, 1933. The Loyalist provided service to Miramichiers from 1955 to 1961.
The Loyalist was the largest of the ferryboats to cross the Miramichi. It could carry twenty cars per trip.
In 1961, the heavy equipment was removed from the loyalist and was shipped back to Saint John. The body of the boat was hauled to Black Brook. It laid on the shore of the Miramichi and was washed away by the rough waters.
Picture & write up taken from Our Miramichi Heritage Family FB page : Karl Wade 
Le loyaliste au travail le 12 septembre 1957
Au printemps 1955, les Loyalistes succèdent à Frances Ullock. Elle a été amenée à Miramichi depuis Saint John. Ce traversier en bois a été construit à Shelbourne, en Nouvelle-Écosse, et a été
lancé le 1er avril 1933. Le Loyaliste a servi les Miramichiers de 1955 à 1961.
Le Loyalist était le plus gros des traversiers à traverser la Miramichi. Il pouvait transporter vingt voitures par trajet.
En 1961, léquipement lourd a été retiré du loyaliste et a été renvoyé à Saint John. Le corps du bateau a été transporté à Black Brook. Il reposait sur la rive de la Miramichi et a été emporté par les eaux agitées.
Photo et écriture tirées de la page FB Our Miramichi Heritage Family : Karl Wade #historicmiramichi #miramichi #beaubearsisland #beaubearsisland❤️

The Loyalist at work on Sept.12,1957
In the spring of 1955, the Loyalist took over from the Frances Ullock. She was brought to the Miramichi from Saint John. This wooden ferry was built in Shelbourne, Nova Scotia, and was
launched on April 1, 1933. The Loyalist provided service to Miramichiers from 1955 to 1961.
The Loyalist was the largest of the ferryboats to cross the Miramichi. It could carry twenty cars per trip.
In 1961, the heavy equipment was removed from the loyalist and was shipped back to Saint John. The body of the boat was hauled to Black Brook. It laid on the shore of the Miramichi and was washed away by the rough waters.
Picture & write up taken from Our Miramichi Heritage Family FB page : Karl Wade
Le loyaliste au travail le 12 septembre 1957
Au printemps 1955, les Loyalistes succèdent à Frances Ullock. Elle a été amenée à Miramichi depuis Saint John. Ce traversier en bois a été construit à Shelbourne, en Nouvelle-Écosse, et a été
lancé le 1er avril 1933. Le Loyaliste a servi les Miramichiers de 1955 à 1961.
Le Loyalist était le plus gros des traversiers à traverser la Miramichi. Il pouvait transporter vingt voitures par trajet.
En 1961, l'équipement lourd a été retiré du loyaliste et a été renvoyé à Saint John. Le corps du bateau a été transporté à Black Brook. Il reposait sur la rive de la Miramichi et a été emporté par les eaux agitées.
Photo et écriture tirées de la page FB Our Miramichi Heritage Family : Karl Wade #historicmiramichi #miramichi #beaubearsisland #beaubearsisland❤️
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janvier 24th, 6:00
The forest is a place of peace where trees talk to you and even a mysterious silence listens to you.
“I seem, like everything else, to be a center, a sort of vortex, at which the whole energy of the universe realizes itself.. Each one of us, not only human beings but every leaf, every weed, exists in the way it does, only because everything else around it does. The individual and the universe are inseparable.” 
 ~Alan Watts

The forest is a place of peace where trees talk to you and even a mysterious silence listens to you.
“I seem, like everything else, to be a center, a sort of vortex, at which the whole energy of the universe realizes itself.. Each one of us, not only human beings but every leaf, every weed, exists in the way it does, only because everything else around it does. The individual and the universe are inseparable.”
~Alan Watts
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janvier 23rd, 6:00
Family snowshoeing to Beaubears Island. 
Raquette en famille à lîle Beaubears.

#familytime #outdoorfun #beaubearsisland #wellness #freshair #miramichiriverImage attachmentImage attachment

Family snowshoeing to Beaubears Island.
Raquette en famille à l'île Beaubears.

#familytime #outdoorfun #beaubearsisland #wellness #freshair #miramichiriver
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janvier 22nd, 5:14
Amazing article shared by John English on Remembering Nelson FB. Dr Shawn McCarthy shared some photographs and info as well.
Very interesting read. Personally I learn so much from post such as these.Image attachmentImage attachment

Amazing article shared by John English on Remembering Nelson FB. Dr Shawn McCarthy shared some photographs and info as well.
Very interesting read. Personally I learn so much from post such as these.
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janvier 21st, 6:00

Comment on Facebook

Special credit to Dorthy Taylor for giving me the article. Thank you Dorthy and Dr. Shawn McCarthy !

Wellness Wednesday ... See MoreSee Less

janvier 19th, 10:00

Comment on Facebook

Great thoughts Ken. Very much enjoyed your perspective on this quote. Thank you. Going out for a walk in the woods this afternoon and will give this more thought.

Video image

youtu.be/H3vreVBsZeU ... See MoreSee Less

janvier 17th, 6:00

Comment on Facebook

Nelson Rural School 

Photo credit to David Rogers
Taken from Remembering Nelson FB

École rurale de Nelson

Crédit photo à David Rogers
Extrait de Remembering Nelson FB

 #goodoledays #nelson #nelsonschool #friendofbeaubearsisland

Nelson Rural School

Photo credit to David Rogers
Taken from Remembering Nelson FB

École rurale de Nelson

Crédit photo à David Rogers
Extrait de Remembering Nelson FB

#goodoledays #nelson #nelsonschool #friendofbeaubearsisland
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janvier 17th, 6:00

Comment on Facebook

The overhead walkway was built between Nelson Junior High and Nelson Intermediate. This allowed District 10 to rename the building(s) as Nelson Rural School. Nelson Elementary (the White School) closed. Then, instead of simply making small renovations to each building, Mr. Paul Dawson, suggested we remove the Nelson Intermediate building and add to the former Nelson Junior (High) School. This, thanks to Paul, was done and the "New" Nelson Rural became a reality.

A photo I took in 2003

Winter is simple
no clutter, no color
a blanket of snow
reminds us to rest
~Terri Guillemets

Winter is simple
no clutter, no color
a blanket of snow
reminds us to rest
~Terri Guillemets
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janvier 15th, 6:00
I remember a particular practice that occurred many Christmases in what we called the front room at the house in the 70s. It was used for the Christmas tree and the card parties that my mother had, and for visitors. My twin and I did not play wrestle mania in that room, or we would have caused damage to furniture that our parents would rather not be damaged. And every Christmas it was used to help a lot of families have decent food for the holidays.
My parents were active in the church, and the churchs attendees and the local Co-op made significant efforts to support families in need. I didnt understand how they knew what families would need support. I didnt understand where the money came from to provide this support. A ten year old doesnt need to know that anyway. But at those Christmases a family list would appear. And the room would be used to store cardboard boxes and the groceries that would go in them. The boxes would have the family names because I suppose that there would be different amounts of food because of different numbers of people in the families. So the room would fill will up with dozens of the items. The Co-op would order and store so many of a frozen item for the efforts ahead of time.
So why did this even take place? First of all we were a small community and we knew each other. Secondly the community members werent rich, but those that were able wanted to give where it was needed. So the delivery day would arrive and off we would go. Much like a grocery Santa I suppose. Economically the 70s were an economic nightmare in many months. A lot of families survived because an adult worked on a federal works grant just to get enough unemployment stamps to have unemployment insurance for the rest of the year. Back then unemployment was a serious matter. For some families funding a good Christmas dinner was a serious challenge. I remember realizing that even though my own family wasnt rich, we were in better shape than whomever answered the door when I went up and knocked. I remember the true and deep appreciation in a mothers face when I gave her the box of Christmas kindness(in our eyes) to her(but in her eyes a necessity).
It deeply struck home to a ten year old kid, and I never forgot that experience. My oldest daughter Alexa English is a project co-coordinator at a community support organization in another part of NB. Supporting disadvantaged persons is what they do. She is well educated from UNB and could make a lot more money doing X or Y. But this is important to her. I like to think that it is her grandparents in her coming out. I am proud of her for that. Our highest calling is to love one another, and I think especially at Christmas.

Story shared by Joh English.

I remember a particular practice that occurred many Christmases in what we called "the front room" at the house in the 70's. It was used for the Christmas tree and the card parties that my mother had, and for visitors. My twin and I did not play wrestle mania in that room, or we would have caused damage to furniture that our parents would rather not be damaged. And every Christmas it was used to help a lot of families have decent food for the holidays.
My parents were active in the church, and the church's attendees and the local Co-op made significant efforts to support families in need. I didn't understand how they knew what families would need support. I didn't understand where the money came from to provide this support. A ten year old doesn't need to know that anyway. But at those Christmases a family list would appear. And the room would be used to store cardboard boxes and the groceries that would go in them. The boxes would have the family names because I suppose that there would be different amounts of food because of different numbers of people in the families. So the room would fill will up with dozens of the items. The Co-op would order and store so many of a frozen item for the efforts ahead of time.
So why did this even take place? First of all we were a small community and we knew each other. Secondly the community members weren't rich, but those that were able wanted to give where it was needed. So the delivery day would arrive and off we would go. Much like a grocery Santa I suppose. Economically the 70's were an economic nightmare in many months. A lot of families survived because an adult worked on a federal works grant just to get enough unemployment stamps to have unemployment insurance for the rest of the year. Back then unemployment was a serious matter. For some families funding a good Christmas dinner was a serious challenge. I remember realizing that even though my own family wasn't rich, we were in better shape than whomever answered the door when I went up and knocked. I remember the true and deep appreciation in a mother's face when I gave her the box of Christmas kindness(in our eyes) to her(but in her eyes a necessity).
It deeply struck home to a ten year old kid, and I never forgot that experience. My oldest daughter Alexa English is a project co-coordinator at a community support organization in another part of NB. Supporting disadvantaged persons is what they do. She is well educated from UNB and could make a lot more money doing X or Y. But this is important to her. I like to think that it is her grandparents in her coming out. I am proud of her for that. Our highest calling is to love one another, and I think especially at Christmas.

Story shared by Joh English.
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janvier 14th, 8:30

Comment on Facebook

Great reminder that we get more by giving than receiving. Thank you John.

It was a remarkable experience for a youngster.

Wonderful story but still to this day there’s a ton of people that consider EI their livelihood ,the problem is, that’s the way they want it

As I said at the end of the interview, I truly believe that YOU have a story to tell. Even in my own lifetime, there have been remarkable changes to our Miramichi community in the last 50+ years. We have lost a great deal beginning with St Thomas University moving to Fredericton in the early ‘60’s. I don’t want memories about what we have lost or what has changed to not be recorded from a Miramichi citizen perspective and thus lost for eternity.
Citizens that have lived a life different than our 2022 reality have seen and experienced interesting things (even if they don't think so), and they will not be on this earth forever. And I want to record your story for current and future generations.
I want to know what you remember that was significant in the past which would be of a general interest to Miramichiers, both now and in the future. I even want to know what your life was like doing ordinary things such as working in the home or outside the home in the Miramichi region (from the headwaters of our rivers to Tabusintac/Escuminac). What was it like to volunteer for this cause or that cause back in the day? What was it like to simply live where you did in younger days? Simple lifestyle things that are different than today may seem insignificant in your mind, but in the future (or even now), they will be (or are) almost unimaginable. Maybe it is even a subject matter passed on to you from a relative or friend that is now deceased. I want their tale to be recorded too.
These days we have to be careful with viruses both biologically and electronically. And I want to hear the story from you yourself, so as to authenticate the story teller. I want to record your story digitally over a phone call or using the Teams software on your computer. My phone number is a local call from within the Miramichi region. Or I can call you anywhere within Canada at no charge to you. If you wish to remain publicly anonymous, I can arrange that. I will transcribe your story to paper (you will get a copy), and give you a CD that has your story on it. I will not accept digitally anything from you (this is to protect my computer system).
The end goal will be to let the community and even the world to know your story online and possibly in a book(s) that contain(s) many stories (any profits will be donated to local historical establishments yet to be determined). In the event that a book is to be published, you will be notified ahead of time. But a published book does not come cheap, and it would have to be underwritten by one or more of these historical establishments. Of course you may, in the process of telling your story, identify a person by name. That name will not be revealed publicly unless they personally have authorized for that to happen. Since it is your story, it will be your responsibility to obtain the authorization if a name will be revealed. The default will be to not reveal a name unless authorized. Privacy will have the upmost priority.
My family has been in the community since 1836. Dad was a historical researcher and author, and he did a fine job; my goal is to try to live up to his standards of penmanship and integrity. I still live in the Miramichi region. This is my home, and I will pursue this endeavor with the upmost respect for you and how you or others wish to be publicly identified (or not to be publicly identified). There will be no charge to you for the CD or the printed transcribed copy, these will be my gifts to you for sharing what you have to tell me.
My time and efforts will be wholly on a volunteer bases. I will receive no financial remuneration now or in the future. If you wish to talk but to not indicate this online, I will provide a phone number with voice mail that you can use to contact me. I will provide a mailing address if you want to write out and mail your story (but I will need to call you to verify that you are the author). I will communicate during off work hours, and not later than 9pm at night.
But I don't know if people even believe that this is a good idea to start with. Without indicating that you have a story to tell (because some may wish to remain totally anonymous), is this idea worth doing in your mind?

fb.watch/aw5Zo73Bu8/
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janvier 13th, 1:16